[Previous] [Main Index] [Next]

Thursday, June 9, 2011

WILL THE AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM HURT THE ABILITY OF THE USA TO COMPETE EFFECTIVELY WITH POTENTIAL GREAT POWER RIVALS?

 Oh Oh

Busy the last two months with intensive work on improving his kung-fu --- a big buggy mix of various Chinese martial arts that he's practiced over the years--- prof  bug, it turns out, hasn't posted here since early April (2011) . . . much to his surprise.  Here, by way of a new start, is a commentary left by the buggy professor in yesterday's Financial Times. 

The Subject 

The thread that started the comments' section is by an FT editor, a specialist in international affairs.  It deals with China's future as a likely great-power rival to the USA global position on a wide range of power-laden indices: economic, military, innovative potential on both of these, soft power, and diplomatic influence.  As a fast-moving survey, it's a good journalistic article and well worth reading.  Click here for the article and the comments section.  Note that if you haven't already done so, you will have to register (all free) to access the link.  Considering the high quality of the Financial Times, it's well worth the effort . . . the FT unrivaled when it comes to global economic affairs.   Yes, better the Wall Street Journal (another good source of commentary).   And as good as the weekly Economist.

Prof Bug's Comment Deals With . . .

Only one aspect of American power and influence, our educational system at all levels . . . prompted by the widespread misconception that American education, at any rate below the university level, is noticeably deficient in comparative international perspective.  As prof bug shows, not for the first time, mind you, the misconception is fed and lives on as a notorious urban myth.